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Made Some Chicken Stock, First Time. Got a Question.

 
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jeepdad



Joined: 29 Aug 2009
Posts: 1202
Location: Stafford, VA

PostPosted: Monday 9-8-2014 1:33 pm    Post subject: Made Some Chicken Stock, First Time. Got a Question. Reply with quote

So, I been wanting to make my own stock for a long time just have not taken the time to make some. That all changed this past weekend. With gumbo weather fast approaching I wanted to make stock ahead of time and have on hand. So I did. I have always used water while making gumbo wanted to try using homemade stock.


Forty-three and a half pounds of deboned thighs and drumsticks. Man, the stock better make my gumbo sing because it took a while to debone.


Cold water added.


I think I'm going to have to take some out because when I add the bones it will overflow.


Bones done in the oven for an hour to brown up...per the recipe. Had a third tray too.


Bones added.


About hour three and a half to four.


Veggies and spices added. Man the house smelled great!






Smoked a couple chickens while making the stock. The girls had 3-4 friends over to help us eat.








Smashed taters.


Strained the stock twice and this is what I got. Canning pot full of stock. I let it sit for three hours then placed in the fridge for two days.


After taking out of the fridge I spooned the fat cap off. Time to bag the stock for the freezer.


Four gallons so far. I will take out of the box and stack once it freezes. Put in the box in case of a leak.


One more gallon so five altogether. Can you say big pot of gumbo!!!

Question for you stock makers.

1. The recipe says if I did it right it should be clear. Mine is not clear and I think I followed the recipe only a larger scale. Any thoughts?

Thanks for looking.

--Dan


CHICKEN STOCK
(from the Gumbo Pages website)

Don't be intimidated by this. It's easy. You have four parts to making a stock -- the COLD water, the bones/meat, the aromatic vegetables (or mirepoix to use the snooty French culinary term) and the seasonings packet (or sachet d'epices, in French).

For a white chicken stock, place the bones/meat directly into the cold water for the stock; for a brown stock, brown the bones in a 350°F oven until dark golden brown, almost an hour. This makes an incredibly rich, flavorful stock with tons of body. If you don't have five hours to make stock, you can do the quick chicken stock in about an hour.

This recipe works well for turkey or duck stocks also.

6 quarts cold water
8 pounds chicken parts (backs, necks, etc.) and bones, or a whole chicken, cut up

Mirepoix
8 ounces onions, chopped
4 ounces celery with tops, chopped
4 ounces carrots, chopped
2 small heads garlic, cut in half horizontally

Sachet d'epices
1 teaspoon or so black peppercorns, cracked
6-8 parsley stems, chopped
1 bay leaf
1/4 tsp. dried thyme leaves
1/4 tsp. dried tarragon leaves
1/4 tsp. dried oregano leaves
1/4 tsp. dried basil leaves

The above ingredients are placed into a 4" square of cheesecloth and tied into a sack, or use a metal tea ball.

Remove the skin from the chicken and chop into 3-4 inch pieces, making sure to cut through and expose the bones. Put the chicken in the stockpot with the water and bring slowly to a simmer. Periodically skim off any scum that forms, and if you wish use a skimmer to skim off the fat. (This stock simmering process makes your house smell REALLY good!) Let this simmer for at least three, and preferably four hours. (It is this long simmering process that extracts the maximum flavor from the chicken meat and bones, as well as the natural gelatin from the bones. When refrigerated, a good chicken stock will be clear and gelatinous.)

Add the mirepoix and sachet; tie the sachet closed with some twine and tie the long end of the twine to the handle of the pot; this makes the bag easier to retrieve. (A tea ball also works well.) Simmer for at least one more hour.

Remember that during the simmering process, it's best not to stir the stock. The end result will be much clearer if it is not agitated while simmering.

Strain thoroughly; the best way to do this is to ladle the stock out and pour it through a strainer which has been lined with a couple of layers of damp cheesecloth. If you're using the stock immediately, skim off as much fat as you can with a fat skimmer or a piece of paper towel, otherwise cool the stock right away by placing the container into an ice-water-filled sink, stirring to bring the hot liquid from the center to the sides of the container. Don't just put hot stock in the refrigerator; it won't cool enough to prevent possible multiplication of harmful bacteria. To defat the stock easily, refrigerate overnight, until the fat solidifies on the surface, then skim off.

You'll know you've made a really great stock with lots of body when you refrigerate it overnight, and the next morning when you go to skim off the fat the stock looks like chicken Jell-O. (See it jiggle!)

Makes about 4 quarts of stock.
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cliffmeister2000
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Joined: 21 Jan 2009
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Location: Surprise (NorthWest of Phoenix) Arizona

PostPosted: Monday 9-8-2014 2:45 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I don't know anything about making stock, but man, that looks good! Thumbs Up
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jeepdad



Joined: 29 Aug 2009
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Location: Stafford, VA

PostPosted: Monday 9-8-2014 4:33 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Thanks Cliff. I hope all is well my friend.

--Dan
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Aggroman
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PostPosted: Monday 9-8-2014 4:40 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I'm with Cliff, no idea about stock, but I can only imagine how awesome that house smelled all day. Looks great Dan! And those birds look sooooo good!

I like it when you're at home for a while. You need to tell work to give you more time off so you can cook more for us over here at Camp Cook. Laughing Laughing
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SeabeeCook



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PostPosted: Monday 9-8-2014 5:39 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

It's been awhile since I made stock at work. I use 5 to 6 pounds chicken bones and 6 quarts cold water, plus onion, carrot, celery, parsley, bay and peppercorns. That's it.

Bring to a boil, then turn heat down to low simmer. Buddle should barley break the surface during the simmer. Make sure you strain the stock in several layers of cheesecloth. The cheesecloth removes much more impurities than using a strainer by itself.

Taste should be the determining factor as to a successful stock or not. For a more flavorful stock, place it back over the heat and reduce it by a third or so. Reduction concentrates flavor.
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J2



Joined: 13 Jul 2010
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PostPosted: Monday 9-8-2014 8:27 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Hi Dan - Great pics. Thanks for posting.

I don't make "stock", but I make Chicken Soup all winter long to have with lunch each day. I have found that more fat in the stock will make it cloudier. I usually keep it in the fridge in smaller serving size containers for 3 days before freezing. This gives enough time and space for the fat to really rise to the top. I even freeze it with the fat and "pop" it off before reheating.

I don't know if this will help you next time, but smaller containers and longer in the fridge might help.

Let us know how it goes!
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John D



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PostPosted: Tuesday 9-9-2014 5:14 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I make stock all the time and always leave the bones in while cooking. Once the meat is done I remove it and throw the bones back in with everything that I can find in the fridge and pantry. Lots od seasonings. Its like making beans. Everything taste good in them......even bacon??
Once your done. Let it cool in the fridge for a few and it makes it easy to get the fat off the top.
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jeepdad



Joined: 29 Aug 2009
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PostPosted: Tuesday 9-9-2014 1:01 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Thanks Scott. Would love to have a big Camp Cook get together!

SeabeeCook, thanks. I agree taste will be the determining factor.

J2, Hi, long time no see. I hope all is well. Thanks for the feedback. I tried to trim a lot of the fat off but after a while I was just plowing through the chicken to get it done. Hope all is well.

John D Sounds good to me. Thanks

--Dan
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Staci



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PostPosted: Friday 9-12-2014 6:43 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

From my knowledge - never boil, keep at a super low simmer, and never stir - then strain the mess out of it.

This is especially true for making broths/stocks from smoked meats to keep the liquid from becoming cloudy or milky in color.
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John D



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PostPosted: Friday 9-12-2014 7:22 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Staci wrote:
From my knowledge - never boil, keep at a super low simmer, and never stir - then strain the mess out of it.

This is especially true for making broths/stocks from smoked meats to keep the liquid from becoming cloudy or milky in color.


Yep. Another key to it. Low and slow.. I guess you could take the back side of a butcher knife to the bones aswell.
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Crash Ash



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PostPosted: Sunday 9-14-2014 2:20 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Never boil your stock, strain with cheesecloth, then drop in a couple of egg whites and then strain again. The egg whites will help clear the stock.

I make stock from left overs all the time. If it turns out cloudy at this point I really don't care anymore. You can't tell ounce it becomes Gumbo. Also it is really hard to make a clear stock when you cook it down enough to make it like jello when it spends the night in the ice box.

I also store mine in plastic bags. I put 2 cups in per bag so I know how much I need for what ever I am using it for.
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Deltaboy



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PostPosted: Wednesday 11-5-2014 8:03 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

It just the fat level in your stock is high and that good.
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jeepdad



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PostPosted: Wednesday 11-12-2014 6:42 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Thanks for all the good tips and information. it is appreciated.

--Dan
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Joanne
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PostPosted: Wednesday 11-12-2014 7:42 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

When I learned, we brought the stock to just a simmer then immediately turned it down till just the occasional bubble would appear. Also, skim off the grey "schmutz" that appears on the top at the beginning of process. That is supposed to make the stock less murky.

All that said, unless you are making consommé it probably doesn't matter much if it's not clear. It's all about the flavor and the gelatin. You'll never want to use canned "stock" again.

Joanne
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